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Jamie Martin, LPC

Mrs. Martin began studying psychology in her undergraduate education at Columbia International University. Just six months before beginning her studies, she worked at an orphanage in Nicaragua. This experience of being a caretaker and teaching English classes to children with severe attachment and mood difficulties influenced her decision to study psychology.  During college, Mrs. Martin volunteered at William S. Hall, a residential psychiatric treatment facility for children & adolescents, where she assisted leading a social skills group for children. She also volunteered as an advocate at Sexual Trauma Services taking crisis calls and providing hospital accompaniment to recent assault victims. This experience sparked her interest in working with trauma in counseling.

While in graduate school at Clemson University’s Clinical Mental Health program, Mrs. Martin counseled children and families at Carolina Family Services and Greenville Mental Health. However, it was her experience working at the Partial Hospitalization and Intensive Outpatient Program at Marshall I. Pickens Hospital that guided her to the theory of DBT and a skills-based treatment orientation.

Mrs. Martin graduated from Clemson University in May of 2015 with a Masters and Educational Specialist degree in clinical mental health counseling.  In order to further her knowledge of DBT, Mrs. Martin received intensive DBT training in June of 2015 from Linehan-trained therapists and in Radically-Open DBT (RO-DBT), a treatment for Treating Over-Control Problems in 2016-17.  She has also received specialized treatment for treating teens and families in DBT, Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills with Multi-Problem Adolescents (2015). In addition to working extensively with DBT, in 2020, Mrs. Martin was intensively trained in Exposure-Response Prevention (ERP) by The Center for the Treatment and Study of Anxiety at the University of Pennsylvania. ERP is a treatment shown by research to effectively treat Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD).